Tag Archives: EM Power +

Margot Kidder and Me

By Marvin Ross

Like so many of you, I was saddened by the passing of Canadian actress Margot Kidder. Aside from her acting, she was an advocate for those with serious mental illness and, as a celebrity, she was the recipient of unwanted publicity.

Regular readers of my material know that I have been writing and speaking about the vitamin “treatment” for mental illness called EM Power plus put out by the Southern Alberta company called Truehope. Early on in our investigation of this product and its claims, my colleagues and I came upon an article in the Calgary Sun dated September 19, 2001. The paper reported that Tony Stephan, one of the founders of the company, had been invited along with his partner, David Hardy, to an award ceremony in LA to honour Ms Kidder. The event was sponsored by a group called Safe Harbour.

The newspaper article stated that:

“Kidder who suffers from mental illness and has benefited from EM Power, made international headlines several years back when she was living in a cardboard box. For Kidder and thousands like her, Stephan has become her superman”.

I contacted her in Montana and this is her e-mail back to me:

In response to your questions, no I do not take Synergy or EMPower, whatever that is, and Tony Stephan is certainly not my superman as I have no idea who he is, nor do I know who David Hardy is. I have made a point of not endorsing any products at all. Where on earth did you read such a thing and how can I get hold of them to correct this misrepresentation? Thanks for bringing this to my attention.

best, Margot Kidder

See Pig Pills Inc, P 50

I’m not sure if Margot ever did contact the Calgary Sun but Tony Stephan’s son is in the news again now. David Stephan and his wife are the parents who fed their little boy various so called naturalistic remedies including EM Power. When he became far sicker, they called an ambulance but it was too late and he died of preventable meningitis.

The Stephans were convicted in a lengthy trial and they appealed that conviction all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada. In mid-May, the court found that the trial judge had made a number of errors in his charge to the jury and have ordered a new trial. While I am outraged at the court decision, in sober reflection the good judges were not commenting on what happened but on the actions of the trial judge. I have little doubt that the Stephans will be found guilty again.

Meanwhile, the Truehope saga gets even stranger. A few years ago, I received a call from someone in California wanting to disclose that there was a secret ingredient in EM Power + and it was that secret ingredient that made it so effective. This individual told me that law suits against the company were imminent. It turned out that he wanted my investigative colleagues and me to pay him for his information so that we could, in turn, make a lot of money selling this “expose” to papers and media around the world.

That was the last I heard until about a month ago when I received a friend request on Linkedin from a David Rowland of Guelph. I ignored that as I remember the guy from an article I did on alternative nonsense called “Also Good for Gout….” and reprinted here.

This is what I wrote about him:

Nutritionist David Rowland continued with that theme and claimed that 106,000 people are killed each year by drugs that are properly prescribed and taken.

U.S. psychiatrist and anti-quack advocate Dr. Stephen Barrett describes David Rowland on his website (www.quackwatch.org) as “one of Canada’s leading promoters of nutrition nonsense” and says “his writings and speeches advocate ‘freedom of choice’ and decreased government regulation of the health marketplace. His entrepreneurial activities have included practising as a ‘nutrition consultant,’ writing articles and booklets, publishing a magazine, operating a correspondence school, and issuing ‘credentials’ for ‘nutrition consultants’.”

David Rowland was referred to as a Ph.D, but this is what Dr. Barrett has to say about that: “His Ph.D. degree was obtained from Donsbach University, a non-accredited correspondence school operated by Kurt Donsbach, a chiropractor who has engaged in so many health schemes that nobody — including the man himself — can document all of them with certainty.”

David Rowland was also introduced to the audience as a member of the New York Academy of Sciences. The implication was that this membership gave greater credence to what he had to say. A call to the academy revealed that he is a member, but that members are not elected. Anyone can join. All that is required is payment of the membership fee. Membership does not mean that the work members do is endorsed by the academy, the public relations official stressed, although that is sometimes attempted. A recent example, he said, was the dictator of Turkmenistan, who joined and then claimed he was elected until the academy objected.

Needless to say, David Rowland was totally opposed to regulation of the industry — but not, he said, because of the issue of increased cost for compliance with good manufacturing practices his company and others will be required to follow under the new legislation. “The issue,” he stressed, “is your lives and safety” and the “censorship” being applied by Health Canada in its rules against the making of unproven claims for products.

When I ignored his request, I got an e-mail from him with a sworn affidavit for a legal action he has commenced against Truehope. He is suing them because he claims that EM Power contains a secret ayurvedic ingredient called Shilajit and it is believed that shilajit in whole or in part is responsible for the remarkable recovery from mental illness claimed by the product. David Rowland states that he holds the patent for this product and that the Truehope people have violated his rights.

Shortly after I received this e-mail, mental health advocate Natasha Tracy got in touch with me because she received the same information. Natasha had written some very damning blogs about EM Power.

What can I say other than:

Pulling your Hair Out

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On The Preventable Death of A Child – The Human Tragedy of “Alternative Medicine”

By Marvin Ross

It is a terrible tragedy and the focus of worldwide attention. Ezekiel Stephan was a 19 month old toddler whose parents are presently being tried in Lethbridge Alberta for failing to provide the necessities of life for him. Ezekiel was treated by his parents with various alternative products for what they thought was a cold and croup until he stopped breathing. He was airlifted to Calgary’s Children’s Hospital where he arrived brain dead and soon died of what was diagnosed as bacterial meningitis.

David Stephan, the father, is the son of one of the founders of Truehope – a supplement company that promotes its product, EM Power + (EMP), for psychiatric conditions and recommends that its customers go off medication. I have been writing about them for over 15 years and, along with Dr Terry Polevoy of Waterloo, ON and Ron Reinhold, a former Health Canada inspector and now private investigator in Calgary, we published an E-book called Pig Pills Inc: The Anatomy of An Academic and Alternative Health Fraud. Ron has done an excellent summary of the Truehope history on his website, Rainbow Investigations

Both David Stephan and his wife, Collet, took EMP and gave it to Ezekiel. And both parents worked at sales and marketing for Truehope.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation just obtained and made available the medical interview/history done in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Calgary hospital. Aside from the history of Ezekiel’s symptoms and the emergency that precipitated his being airlifted to Calgary, is the family medical history. It is frightening in my opinion.

Collet had no prenatal care from a physician but from a family friend who is a nurse and who helped at delivery. Ezekiel had never been seen by a doctor and was never given any vaccinations. During her pregnancy and while breastfeeding, Collet took EMP. For occasional colds, Ezekiel was given olive oil leaf extract and garlic. According to testimony at the trial, the nurse did suggest that Ezekiel had meningitis and to take him to the ER. They did not but rather went to a naturopath to get some echinacea.

His medications from about 11 months on consisted of daily smoothies containing EMP, Omega 3-6-9, whey protein, FermPlus, and a digestive enzyme. The autopsy report is also available at the bottom of this article for anyone who can stomach the findings.

According to the label for EMP, pregnant and lactating women should consult a doctor before using the product and it advises that the product be kept away from children under 6. And yet seemingly Collet took the product without consulting a doctor and gave it to her child. When EMP was first used in a study at the University of Calgary, Dr Catherine Field, a nutrition researcher at the University of Alberta, told me that she did not know if this product was safe but felt that it could be used short term as long as the research subjects were monitored by a medical doctor. She further stated that it was unsafe for pregnant women or for women who might become pregnant and thus pregnant women were excluded from the study. (P 66 of Pig Pills).

I also have in my possession a freedom of information document provided by Health Canada to an investigative reporter at the Canadian Television Network (CTV) on the adverse events associated with EMP reported to Health Canada. The document is dated January 2007 and deals with “near misses” and reports of Truehope activities.

In one case, a family contacted the owner of Truehope (not named) and it was alleged the family was advised not to seek medical help from a doctor. In another case, a 50 year old woman with multiple gall stones was contacted by an unnamed owner and told to refuse surgery but to take large amounts of olive oil (which the report said is contraindicated).

Two reports to Health Canada were filed by Truehope employees but the information was redacted. In another case, a doctor reported that his pregnant patient was taking EMP and he cautioned her about it as it had an unknown safety profile. The woman checked with Truehope and was assured that it was safe although the doctor was concerned that the information she was given was inaccurate.

There was a great deal of discussion in these documents over safety in children and in pregnant and lactating women and Health Canada insisted that warnings be given about its use for those populations on the label.

Truehope, for psychiatric conditions, recommends that prescription medication be stopped. In 2012, I reported on a case in British Columbia where a man with schizophrenia replaced his psychiatric medication for EMP and became so psychotic that he murdered his father. The headline on one paper proclaimed that vitamin therapy contributed to murder. I followed up with an article asking why Health Canada allowed this agent to be sold and that question is still relevant.

For those interested in the type of advice that Truehope gives to the mentally ill over the phone, you will find these interesting. We had a doctor develop a number of hypothetical scenarios that were then checked for accuracy by a psychiatrist. Frightening is all I can say.

And undoubtedly Tony Stephan will threaten to sue me for this blog. He once threatened to sue The Scientist for an article I wrote about his company and  he has threatened me  with legal action more than once in the past. More recently, he threatened to sue mental health writer and advocate, Natasha Tracy.