Tag Archives: Donald Trump

Trick or Trump

By Dr David Laing Dawson

I had in my office yesterday an 11 year old who was in a bit of trouble at school. His defense was “Kevin did worse than me and he didn’t get in trouble.”

I laughed and then explained to the parents that I had just read a Donald Trump tweet along the same lines, “What about Crooked Hillary and the Dems.”

The parents smiled warily, but the boy took offense. He did not like being compared to Donald Trump. I tried to explain that deflecting the blame, or trying to do that from an immature sense of playground fairness, was quite appropriate at his age. He was still unhappy that I had compared him to Donald Trump.

Then I saw a 12 year boy, a little fire-plug of a kid who happens to have a mop of blonde hair, a square face, and a passable rendition of a Donald Trump pout. I asked if he was going to go out Halloween as Donald Trump. No way he told me. There are too many Donald Trumps. He was dressing as a robber. Besides, Donald Trump is stupid.

So, at least, I concluded, the fear that Donald Trump might be a role model for our children, at least our Canadian children, is unfounded.

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Trump And/Or God?

By Dr David Laing Dawson

In Richard Russo’s novel, “Nobody’s Fool”, Rub Squeers, sometime friend of Sully (played by Paul Newman in the movie), often says with a stutter, sometimes to Sully, sometimes to himself, “You know what I w-wish -t?”

His wish is usually for a small improvement in his circumstances, never realized. Yet, he is optimistic and quite endearing.

The moment science reported that those among us with a modicum of optimism live longer, recover faster from illness, and tolerate chronic illness better than pessimists, a poster went up in the hallway of a mental health center I visit, proclaiming HOPE in bold letters. It has since come down.

I thought of these things while watching a bunch of religious (or faith community) leaders praise Donald Trump and the power of prayer in the oval office. One went as far as to announce that we all know prayer works. They each thanked Donald within the same paragraph they thanked God, knowing, I’m sure, who really had the power to dispense favour at this moment.

Of all the players in these three separate stories I think I prefer the simple honesty of Rub Squeers. He wishes, and momentarily it gives him hope and small pleasure, but he has few expectations as he trundles on getting by.

And prayer itself. I have always had a problem with prayer. Okay, it can support hope; it can strengthen community, but this juxtaposition of the stroking of Trump’s ego and the appeals to God certainly drew a clear parallel. For prayer itself implies that before God might notice my suffering, I must praise him. Not just praise him, but prostrate myself before him, beg him to intervene. So that image of God, that particular concept of God, involves an ego even bigger than Donald Trump’s. God the narcissist.

And as long as they have prayer I suppose they can continue to pave over the wetlands, ignore the disrepair of the damns, dykes, levees and drainage systems, cut taxes, remove environmental regulation, promote unfettered growth, and ignore climate change.

The Obama Legacy

By Dr David Laing Dawson

I have had a lifetime of sitting in a comfortable chair, walking safe streets, and observing the struggles of our neighbour to the south. Beneath their constant boasting I witnessed their progress, through Kennedy, desegregation, Johnson, Alabama, Martin Luther King, until finally they elected a black president. Which meant, I thought, that at least half of the population of the United States had worked through their demons of oppression and slavery, of segregation, of racism. Their future looked bright. And if the future of the USA looks bright so does that of the rest of the world.

But when I listen to Donald Trump, to Steve Bannon, to Harvey Weinstein for that matter, and many other white male Americans of age, I realize how much their terrible history is still in play. For beneath all of their bluster, their provocations, their aggression, there lies a deep pool of fear and guilt. Or guilt and then fear, which would be the correct order. Guilt to fear and then to aggression.

It is embodied by Donald Trump. It is being played out by Donald Trump on the world stage. His narcissism is astounding, as is his ability to lie, but he embodies another dynamic that must be addressed if the USA is not going to implode. And that is Donald’s fixation on Barack Obama.

With much of what Trump says he leaves unspoken a final sentence that is beginning to ring loudly in my ears. And that is the removal of the “stain” of Barack Obama; the castration and lynching of Obama, expunging him from history.

The dynamic is guilt (guilt from deeds and thoughts and a denied history) which leads to a fear of retaliation, which is quickly turned into aggression.

It is risky applying individual psychology to the behaviour of groups and nations but over the past 50 years I think I have been watching Cognitive Behavioural Therapy being applied to America’s history of slavery, violence, segregation and racism. Superficially much progress has been made. “We shall overcome.” But I think they need Desmond Tutu. Some truth and reconciliation. A full catharsis if we are not to see this cycle repeated again and again.

That is (and perhaps it will be possible in the backlash choice of president after Donald Trump), they need to really face their history, the truth of slavery, the remnants of the civil war, their guilt and fear. It could start with a loud and public discussion about all those civil war monuments and what to do with them.

After that they could look at the guilt they must feel for the destruction they unleashed on Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. Perhaps if that is ever faced we will no longer read that 50% of Republicans are in favour of a pre-emptive strike on North Korea.

Neo-nazis, thugs, and little boys.

By Dr David Laing Dawson

In our history psychiatry overplayed its hand. As the theories of Freud, Jung, Adler and others caught on, some psychiatrists and psychologists thought we might have something to offer society as a whole. Perhaps psychological intervention could reduce violence generally, and even prevent war and promote peace.

This was overreach. And we are all aware now, I think, that the tools of psychiatry/psychology are more apt to be misused by the state (The Soviet Union), the CIA, Casinos, and by marketing, or building a better soldier, creating brand loyalty, selling junk food to kids, keeping a scholar or athlete focused.

For the most part the profession of psychiatry retreated to being a medical specialty engaged in the treatment of mental illness.

I was thinking of this while watching neo-nazi Christopher Cantwell on his Youtube video. He was an organizer and marcher in Charlottesville, and then a social media hit when he alternately ranted and sobbed on a self-produced video, after hearing there might be a warrant for his arrest.

Why any young and not-so-young American (or German or Canadian for that matter) might proclaim himself a Nazi today is a puzzle. As has been pointed out, they did not grow up watching their fathers lynch Negros or blame Jews for a recession. Where on earth does this come from?

But watching the performance of Christopher Cantwell it occurred to me that I had seen this many times before.

Troubled boys between age 14 and 17. Some ADHD, some labile emotions, and some developmental/cognitive immaturity. Within a half hour they might talk prison talk full of expletive laden revenge, need for respect, blame, threaten, and then cry, weep, apologize to me and their mothers. There is a frightened little boy inside that would-be thug.

They are trapped developmentally, still children dependent on adults, angry their needs are not immediately satisfied, experimenting with male roles of toughness, power, strength, (often borrowed from gang, drug, and prison cultures), ultimately terrified of adulthood and its demands for skills and responsibility.

Most get through this. Good parenting, time for the brain to develop and mature, some boundaries and structures that promote skill building and confidence, more self-reliance, less blaming of others. Sometimes pills for either ADHD or anxiety or both are required.

That is where Chris Cantwell is. I don’t know how much he truly believes what he says, but he is still, developmentally, 14 to 17, at once angry, blaming, playing a macho role, labile and fearful.

So yes, good parenting, some accessible mental health services, the right school system, opportunities to develop skills and confidence, could reduce the number of young men who become neo-nazis, or terrorists for that matter.

Trump’s Great Service to Americans – But Time To Go

By Dr David Laing Dawson

The unraveling of Donald Trump is nigh. And if it happens soon, and if the reaction he has provoked has staying power, then, surprisingly, Donald Trump will have performed a great service for America. Perhaps the reaction to Donald will bring about a better America.

Donald has brought to light the simmering racism, the unholy divide, and the hypocrisy that is America. It has always been there of course, addressed politely from time to time, but recently not so overtly, so publicly that it could not be ignored by others.

To be fair though, the credit probably goes equally to Barack Obama, for it may be this unusual sequence of a first black president, and a very good one, followed by a Donald Trump that so ignited the fires of white supremacists and then lifted the fog of denial from the eyes of liberals.

All of them, the KKK, the Nazis and neo-nazis, the white supremacists, they all quietly nursed their wounds and hatred during Obama’s eight years. Now Donald has set them free.

On Tuesday, August 15, off the teleprompter, peppered with questions, Donald Trump revealed Donald. He was of course full of himself, referring back to his successes, even to his riches, boasting of his holdings, taking credit for an improved economy, defending his first statement after the events in Charlottesville, even taking it from his pocket and reading it again, even shamelessly claiming he received praise from the mother of the woman killed.

He became combative with the press, calling them fake news, stating he is more attentive and truthful than they are.

But most of all this exchange revealed his brittle narcissism and the extent to which he cannot tolerate any criticism, any possibility that he may not be the smartest, the best, the most successful person in the room, that he may have been imperfect this one time. And it revealed how his ego overshadows any concept of country, democracy, history. Asked if he would visit Charlottesville he told us he owns a house and a golf course there, the biggest, thus demonstrating his confusion between being president of a democracy and the emperor of all he surveys.

And it gave us a hint of how mad (this word meant to be read both ways) he will become when he is finally cornered and dethroned.

Do it soon. Do it carefully. Do it with a safety net in place.

“I Think Anthony Will Do Amazing.”

By Dr David Laing Dawson

In his brief sojourn in public life Anthony Scaramucci managed to provide hours of material for the late night shows and many columns of commentary by serious pundits.

It is all so troubling and disturbing. A man so obviously unqualified to be a Communications Director quickly drops the tenor of the office to the level of teen boy locker room talk in an under founded school system.

He has come and gone.

But within all the inaccuracies, lies, egoism, and stupidity of Donald Trump’s statements in an interview with the Wall Street Journal on July 25, this particular use of language stood out for me:

“I think Anthony will do amazing.”

There is a time in one’s development of intellectual and linguistic abilities when nouns and adverbs and adjectives get all mixed up, when the brain cannot yet formulate explanatory secondary clauses, and when the brain does not yet notice the misuse of words, catch this, and then explain further.

That age is about 13, 14, 15. (and younger than this of course)

13, 14, 15 is the age at which I hear kids use the phrase, “will do amazing.”

By 17, if they say “will do amazing” they catch themselves and explain further in a second clause, such as, “I mean, like, I think he will get really high marks.”

By university level they realize that the quality of being amazed belongs to the observer, not the doer, and the whole thing is phrased differently.

And all through the transcripts of recent interviews and off-the-teleprompter speeches it is clear Donald Trump does not catch his own absurdities, his own unfinished thoughts, his own deviations from logic, and his own outrageous boasting.

I hear the same from 14-year-olds in my clinical practice. By 17 or so, most have the ability to hear what they have just said, to notice when it veers from truth or logic.

My American friends, your president is a very narcissistic entitled 14 year old.

Though, I must admit, as damaging as he is to the reputation of America in the rest of the world, he may be less dangerous than many Republican alternatives.

Might I suggest a strategy to keep us all safe: Every other leader in this fragile world of ours should send Donald Trump an effusive Valentine card four times a year, at least.

“Is Donald Trump Human?”

By Dr David Laing Dawson

Men in Black, from 1997, with Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones, is full of good moments. The particular moment that came to mind, for reasons that will become apparent, follows the recruitment of Will Smith to the very small and select team. Tommy Lee is showing Will Smith the ropes. He suggests they “check the hot sheets”. They stop by a News Stand to pick up a couple of tabloids, each with a lurid headline.

“These are the hot sheets?” asks Will.

“Best reporting on the planet,” says Tommy. “Go ahead, read the New York Times if you want. They get lucky sometimes.”

Smith spells out the gag: “I believe you are looking for tips in the supermarket tabloids.”

Their headlines include: “Pope a Father”, “Top Doctors baffled, Baby Pregnant”, “Man Eats Own House” and “Alien Stole My Husband’s Skin.”

The scene is played straight.

It is a very funny moment, I thought.

And I have always assumed that anyone reading these yellow sheets is engaging in a guilty pleasure. They are titillating themselves with implausible stories. Today those titles would be called ‘click bait’.

The publishers of these magazines, when they deal with celebrities, are marketing to our schadenfreude. Ah, how we enjoy reading that the lives of the rich and privileged may be as fraught with conflict and unhappiness, sin and regret, as our own.

But we know that when the story is not an outright lie, a gross exaggeration or invasion of privacy, it is still merely trivial. At least I thought we all understood that.

Hence the entire audience in the theater watching Men in Black got the joke.

But not, apparently, Donald Trump.

It is very distressing to learn that he and the publisher of The National Enquirer are good friends who influence one another. And that this publisher is thinking of buying Time Magazine.

There is a strange slippage afoot. I’m not sure whether we should be boning up on George Orwell or Lewis Carroll.

And I notice another thing entirely by accident. These Men in Black, American enforcement officers for true aliens, extraterrestrial aliens, of all shapes and sizes, some cute, some grotesque, some “legal” and some “illegal”, treat these aliens with much more decency and respect than Donald Trump and ICE treat human “aliens.”

Dump Trump

By Dr David Laing Dawson

If a doctor, teacher, manager, administrator of 70 years of age emailed, announced, or tweeted what Donald Trump just tweeted I would immediately suspect alcohol or frontal lobe dementia. Besides being relieved of his office, or license, his family would take him to a family doctor who might then refer him to either an addiction service or a psychiatrist/neurologist. It would be a striking failure of judgment only plausibly explained by frontal lobe impairment.

With Donald Trump though, this kind of behaviour is not new or unusual. But even a narcissistic misogynistic sociopath might recognize that in the context of being POTUS such a tweet would bring only shame upon his head and reduce, not enhance, his status.

So we have to conclude that either Donald Trump is the same Donald Trump he has always been plus he now has some early dementia, or, his personality disorder is so severe, his ego so fragile, that he cannot stop himself from engaging in a playground (age 14 maybe) retaliation, even when it would be so obviously damaging to him, his family, and his country.

Either diagnosis bodes poorly for the safety of our planet. Please, Republicans, understand this man will take you down with him. It is time to act.

Although, while Trump may be a threat to all things good and sane, from what I see and read, the Republican party in its current form may be an equal or bigger threat to democracy.

Short Unofficial Profiles of the People Around Trump.

By Dr David Laing Dawson

Sessions: Obsequious little man who hides his hatred beneath an endearing smile and a soft southern drawl. Iago comes to mind. But Donald is not Othello. Think Richard III instead.

Kushner: Unreadable age, temperament and intentions. A Mona Lisa smile. No apparent anxiety, worry, puzzlement, or humour. That degree of control and confidence in what should be overwhelming complex human situations can only be explained by psychopathy. If this were a kingdom and he were next in line for the crown he would be plotting the death of the King already. Perhaps he is.

Bannon: I know this man, but not in a position of power. Intellectually brilliant, alone in his squalid rooming house, paying no attention to hygiene or diet as he pores over history and its many conspiracies, iterations and cycles to arrive at his own nihilistic philosophy in which mankind destroys itself and he can then look upon the rubble knowing that he is close to being a God.

Pence: A child-like belief in God and destiny, so much so that he can forgive the most egregious sins and comfort himself that it must all be part of God’s plan, even if it elevates him to a position for which he is not remotely qualified, and even if it casts him among sinners.

Ivanka: Though perhaps a little smarter than her father and perhaps slightly more empathetic, she has otherwise inherited or absorbed his tone-deaf sense of entitlement. I can hear her say, when told the peasants have no bread, “Let them eat cake.” Or at least, “Tell them to architect their own destiny as I have.”

Tillerman: A blunt and successful force in the business world, he became depressed when confronted by the daunting task of being Secretary of State for a naked emperor. He, alone among the group, realizes he has much to learn about government and nations. He will soon have a crisis of conscience. He knows he is on stage in “The Scottish Play”.

Spicer: Sean is a lost soul approaching the gates of hell. He knows it is too late. Ignominy awaits if he rejects Satan now. Ignominy awaits if he continues on this path. He will one day die the Death of Ivan Illych, tormented by his cowardice and his failure of conscience.

Conway: Kellyanne is Madam Bovary, trading on looks and charm, attaching to the man in the room who is most likely to bring her fame and fortune, luxury and TV time. She will happily say whatever pleases this man, easily convincing herself that truth is an overrated commodity. As her looks fade she will have to trade more on her willingness to flatter and lie. And she knows that when her Lord falls under the knives of impeachment she will be a welcome guest on all the talk shows.

Paul Ryan: A career politician since his days as student council president. The gift of a hollow smile and a brain always calculating the vectors of power. Honesty, ethics, morality, reality all fall beneath the sword of political expedience.  He is something of an Ayn Rand libertarian, which really means, “Let no agency have power, unless it is I.” and “I’m all right Jack; so bugger the rest of you.”

 

 

Standing By Trump – Or Not

By Dr David Laing Dawson

As social scientists point out, it is a prime directive for homo sapiens to maintain standing in their community (power, pecking order, value); it is not a prime directive to listen to reason and apply educated perceptual and deductive processes to arrive at a truth. Hence the amazing displays of twisting, selecting, avoiding, diverting, and denial coming from Republican law makers when asked to comment on a particularly stupid, childish or even incriminating comment by Donald Trump.

In the Hans Christian Andersen story it is only a child who is free to blurt out, “But the emperor has no clothes.” The lords, the noblemen, the ladies, the merchants – they all have much to lose. As does the emperor himself.

This emperor, The Donald, likewise has much to lose should he ever admit either ignorance or failure. His whole narcissistic edifice would crumble. He would find himself staring at a reality he has never allowed himself to see before.

And perhaps some of those Republicans do not have law degrees or other marketable skills, and rely on their Government salaries to support five children, an invalid wife, two aging parents, and a large mortgage. These I forgive. They should keep their heads down and avoid microphones. But there are others I am sure who have many options. They would lose but the ephemeral status of a title and invitations to the old boys club.

Yet none speak up.

It is disappointing to learn that in an old democracy an incompetent man can be elected President on the basis of misdirected anger, show business glitz, and ridiculous promises, all flavored with misogyny and racism.

But it is more disappointing to see that not one nobleman, not one lawmaker, is able to overcome the prime directive from our days in the jungle – not one has the courage to put his standing in his community at risk and announce, as the child would, “The emperor has no clothes. The emperor is lying. The emperor is incompetent. I can no longer support the emperor. I resign.”