Assorted Comments on Depression, Schizophrenia and the White House Press Corps

By Marvin Ross

Mental illness is something that is found in many people in all walks of life and to varying degrees of seriousness. Unfortunately, society does not see examples of successful people who are struggling quietly. If we did, maybe more of us would have a greater compassion. I say this with the understanding that someone’s health condition is personal.

Baseball fans will be familiar with the late Roy (Doc) Halladay who died in a single plane crash a few years ago. Halladay was a brilliant pitcher during his time with the Toronto Blue Jays and he continued his brilliance when he went to Philadelphia when he qualified as a free agent. In 2010, he pitched a perfect game (no hits and no walks) and later that year, he pitched a second no hitter. He was only the fifth pitcher to throw two no hitters in one year.

Aside from his skill as a player, Roy showed a great deal of empathy towards kids with disabilities. While in Toronto, he and his wife outfitted a box at the ballpark for children from the local children’s hospital so they could enjoy a game with their families – “Doc’s Box”. Every year with the Jays, he donated $100,000 each year to the Blue Jay’s Charity.

According to a new book just being released, “Doc: The Life of Roy Halladay”, by Todd Zolecki the Philadelphia Phillies beat reporter for MLB.com,:

“He struggled a lot with depression,” Brandy (his wife) said. “He struggled a lot with anxiety. Social anxiety. He never felt like he was good enough or funny enough or liked. He was a sad spirit. But I don’t want that to overshadow all the great times.”

Depression and anxiety can impact anyone.

New Schizophrenia Research

Some new research suggests a reason for the sex disparity in schizophrenia. It is well known that schizophrenia tends to be less severe in females than in men and some have hypothesized that the reason is that the onset in females is later. By the time it raises its head in females, they have had more time to learn academically and social skills. A gene called C4 is more pronounced in men. This gene is protective against lupus and another auto immune disease called Sjogren’s Syndrome. Far more women get these two conditions then men so the suspicion is that it protects men from them but makes them more susceptible to schizophrenia..

Those carrying more of this gene were 7 times less likely to get Lupus and 16 times less likely to develop Sjogren’s. They were 1.6 times more likely to get schizophrenia. This research does suggest some new avenues for treatment of these conditions.

Another bit of research finds that people born blind do not develop schizophrenia. What is thought is that just might be something in the way the world is perceived that protects those who are congenitally blind from developing schizophrenia. If the way a person sees the world is off, it becomes harder to predict what is going to happen and the brain steps in to try to correct for this failure. Someone who is blind from birth, does not have this problem. An interesting observation that needs to be explored with the goal of finding new treatment modalities if this pans out.

Follow Up on the White House Press Corps.

The day after my blog on the failure of White House journalists to challenge Trump’s claims, someone did. Trump got quite upset and walked out. Congratulations to the young lady from CBS for doing that. It is a start but more need to start challenging him.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s