Reflections on Marx, Religion and Opiates For the Masses

By Dr David Laing Dawson

When Karl Marx opined that religion is the opium for the masses it was not the throw away line it is today. I am writing this as I watch the sun set over the gulf of Mexico and smoke my $5 robusto and sip my $20 dollar bourbon.

Within my limited historical scholarship it seems to me that humans, ever since evolution bestowed upon them the awareness of suffering, temporality, and death, have been seeking substances to dampen, or ideas to vanquish, the horrifying experience of that reality.

While some of those substances (LSD, mescaline, ecstasy, opium!) give one a temporary sense of alternate and eternal realities, others merely dampen it.

As I write this the clouds briefly accrue a God-like glow of crimson and then slip into filaments of white against the darkening sky, and the temperature drops a few degrees at this moment on this region of a small planet. I go inside to replenish my glass. Our two dogs come with me; one, oblivious to my thoughts, wants to share his chew toy with me.

While religions, all of them, from the old and organized, to new and old ideas of enlightenment and “oneness with the universe” attempt to obliterate the terror of being sentient beings with limited life spans, substances like marijuana and alcohol merely dampen that reality.

And while religion works for many it has also been the unholy source of corruption, perversion, suffering and death for others.

With a sweater it is warm enough to sit outside and miraculously the WiFi reaches a chair by the barbecue. The sky has become both misty and mystical. A scattering of stars appears between the low clouds. I know I should leave my cigar alone, for the second half will give me an overdose of nicotine and a dry mouth through the night. The replenished glass of bourbon with much ice to soften it will let my eyes linger on the beauty of the night without too many intrusive thoughts.

Marijuana would let me do the same I’m sure.

It is one of those realities that could be used to argue both for and against intelligent design: anything that can make us feel good, or relieve us of the terror of existence, when used excessively, can harm us. I will leave the cigar butt in the ashtray and I resolve to not replenish my glass again. The dogs lie on the cool patio stones beside my chair.

My companion comes out to join me, commenting how lovely it is, and asking if I would like a refill. My resolve vanishes as quickly as a startled gecko.

We sit together in the balmy night air, breezes bringing mist from the gulf, the dogs at our feet, and I think how quickly time passes, and I tell myself to stay in the moment.

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2 thoughts on “Reflections on Marx, Religion and Opiates For the Masses

  1. Sounds idyllic. Many a time I have followed some sleazy looking guy along Bay Street, because I loved the smell of his cigar smoke. Once the man turned around and frightened the living daylights out of me, so I blinked and beat a swift retreat! back to Yonge Street Some blokes can be a bit paranoid under the influence

    In the meantime we up north, chip the ice from outside our igloos in order to go for the bare necessities. We should all follow the Monarchs, but then we do not have wings and must stay in the moment.

    Like

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