More on Families, Privacy And Suicide

By Dr David Laing Dawson

Much of psychiatry is about convincing people to do things that will improve their mood, their health, and their lives. Exercise, better diet, overcoming fears, taking necessary medication, stop taking harmful substances, go to bed earlier, turn off electronics, find balance in your life, join something to overcome loneliness, stop procrastinating, call a relative, tell your husband, plan your day, stop worrying about things you cannot control, take baby steps, take medication regularly as prescribed, go for blood tests, enjoy small pleasures, scream at someone rather than cut yourself….

It is not in the DSM V (I think) but we know “no man is an island”. We are social beings. Maybe not to the extent of bees and ants, but no less than chimpanzees. We are never fully independent life forms. Even a hermit has a relationship (albeit a distorted and contrary one) with the community and family he or she is rejecting.

We also know that the quick impulse to say to the doctor, “Don’t tell my family.” or “I don’t want my family involved.” is often derived from shame, guilt, a sense of failure, and sometimes the opposite, a genuine wish to not burden the other. This is further complicated in the teen and youth years by an ongoing negotiation with respect to power, control, individuation, responsibility. We also know in these years the adolescent often says, in the same breath, “I hate you. Give me a hug.” “Get out of my life. Drive me to the mall.” “Don’t tell my dad. Please tell my dad so he can protect me.”

And we also know that persons suffering from severe anxiety and depression develop a sort of tunnel vision that excludes broad levels of social awareness and understanding. “Leave me alone.” And people suffering from a psychotic illness often harbour delusions about family members. “She’s controlling me.”

So, absolutely, when the young person says, “Don’t involve my family.” professionals should explore this, and then convince the patient otherwise unless there is good evidence that keeping the family (parents, sibs) away will be ultimately better for this patient.

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