Psychotropic Medication, Addiction, Withdrawal, Discontinuation, Relapse

By Dr David Laing Dawson

I can offer some thoughts on this from many years of observation.

Addiction is addiction. Defined as the development of tolerance (requiring more and more of the drug for the same effect) and physiological withdrawal symptoms upon stopping the drug.

Benzodiazepine drugs are addictive. The “pam” drugs. They are safest prescribed for short periods or for intermittent use. But most of us struggle with this because they offer instant relief and there are few alternatives. (this deserves a longer discussion at another time)

SSRI and NSRI antidepressant medications are not (by definition) addictive. We do not develop tolerance and require higher and higher doses. But when they are stopped abruptly patients often suffer “discontinuation” symptoms. Perhaps this is a euphemism for withdrawal symptoms but usually they are not severe, and some people come off SSRI medication without any such symptoms at all.

Usually these symptoms are unlike a true relapse and are short lived. They are described many ways by people using such words and phrases as “not like myself, foggy headed, pinging, buzzing or electric shocks in my head”.

Some of the SSRI and NSRI medications have worse discontinuation symptoms than others. Perhaps Paxil and Effexor XR are the worst offenders. But again, some patients go on and off these medications without any ill effects. Strategies to ameliorate withdrawal effects include very very slow weaning and switching to an SSRI with a longer half-life.

And it is usually not difficult to distinguish these withdrawal symptoms from a relapse of the original illness being treated with these drugs. The withdrawal symptoms are almost immediate, depending on the half-life of the medication; they are odd feelings rather than the slow return of the depression or anxiety disorder they were treating.

A true relapse of the illness may occur months or even years after discontinuation. And usually the discontinuation symptoms last a few days to a couple of weeks. When these illnesses relapse (depression, anxiety, OCD) the symptoms are usually identical to those of the first episode. This fact is one of the reasons it is reasonable to call Depression, Anxiety, and OCD illnesses.

Anxiety disorders and depressions can be chronic persistent disorders or relapsing and remitting disorders. They can be seasonal or more closely associated with events and transitions in life.

Usually these medications work. And the more severe the illness the more dramatically effective they can be.

Do these drugs actually cause a later vulnerability to depression? I think the short answer is “no”. Impossible to prove of course but I have not seen it. But I have seen much relief from suffering and dramatic improvement in function.

With all that, the SSRI’s are undoubtedly over prescribed for less serious mood problems, unhappiness, and disappointment.

Of course if non-pharmacological means of alleviating mood problems do so for you on their own, then by all means use these instead: exercise, meditation, yoga, SADS lamp, counseling and therapies of any kind, better diet and sleep, better balance in life……

But I must admit that in 40 plus years of prescribing life-balance, exercise, meditation and yoga, my patient compliance rate is running roughly 5 percent. It is very hard to initiate any of these activities if you are house bound with anxiety or morbidly depressed.

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3 thoughts on “Psychotropic Medication, Addiction, Withdrawal, Discontinuation, Relapse

  1. I suppose I came across your post at the right time. You see, I am taking a 30 day trip next month to rid myself of the benzodiazepams, Haldol, and other antidepressants that I take as they have slowed me down, my metabolism-I gained 50 pounds since ive been on them over the past 3 and a half years- and caused severe side effects (I developed ulcerative colitis last October). My self confidence keeps getting butchered by friends and family… They keep saying what have you done to yourself, you used to look so good, blame my marriage, and so on and so fourth.

    Anyway maybe you can check my blog, http://www.adamerall.com, and see what I’m taking and maybe leave a helpful comment to my latest post.

    This was very helpful! Thanks

    Like

  2. You would think such cruel diseases would receive massive funding of scientific research to find a cure for them.

    Yet we still rely on old social studies to explain their root causes. We ignore the evidence that our too rare scientific research funding has brought to light that microbes, parasites, prions and misfolded proteins, etc. are the biological root causes of so much human suffering.

    A reading of science-writer Jay Ingram’s “Fatal Flaws: How a Misfolded protein Baffled Scientists and Changed the Way We Look at the Brain” is a good place to understand how we lost our way in understanding brain diseases.

    Like

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